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Tristen Taggart accepts the Riese-Melton Award at VCU's annual PACME celebration. (Photo by Tom Kojcsich, University Marketing)

Four recognized for their efforts to advance equity and inclusivity at VCU

Tristen Taggart only prepared one speech. So at the end of Tuesday’s ceremony for the Presidential Awards for Community Multicultural Enrichment — after Taggart and the other honorees had already been recognized and as Taggart was being announced as the recipient of the event’s capstone award — Taggart gasped, perhaps more surprised than anyone.

Dandridge returns to a warm welcome from his “family” of students lining the hallways, hugging and cheering for their beloved custodian.

He needed a new kidney and heart. VCU Health gave them to him in one operation.

Carlnealius “Tyrees” Dandridge, a custodian at Pole Green Elementary School in Mechanicsville, Virginia, came to VCU Health’s Hume-Lee Transplant Center in 2015 for a kidney transplant evaluation. At that consultation, doctors discovered that not only was his kidney failing, his heart was failing too. Dandridge was in need of a double transplant.

A partnership between the VCU School of Nursing, Southside Virginia Community College and Rappahannock Community College will provide registered nurses who are students at both community colleges a faster path to obtaining a bachelor’s degree.

VCU School of Nursing opens accelerated path to a bachelor's to Rappahannock and Southside Virginia Community Colleges

The Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing has partnered with Southside Virginia Community College and Rappahannock Community College to offer accelerated coursework to registered nurses who are students at both community colleges, providing them a faster path to obtaining a bachelor’s degree. Students will be enrolled concurrently at VCU and their respective community colleges.

Omar Abubaker, speaking at the Rao R. Ivatury Trauma Symposium in late March. (Photo by Kevin Morley, University Marketing)

VCU professor, who lost son to an opioid overdose, said lack of awareness by prescribers contributed to the opioid crisis

The National Institutes of Health estimates that 80% of heroin users started with prescription drug medication. Prescribing practices of doctors and dentists prior to the height of the opioid epidemic are to blame for these numbers, said Omar Abubaker, D.M.D., Ph.D., chair of oral and maxillofacial surgery in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry.

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